All posts by biathlon23

Shawna Pendry: The Interview!

Photo courtesy of Shawna Pendry.

Shawna Pendry is a 17-year-old British biathlete who is based in France. She was born in England but moved to France aged four. She started cross country skiing when she was eight and biathlon at eleven in Font-Romeo where Simon and Martin Fourcade started. Last season was her first competing internationally on the IBU Junior Cup.

Check out her website: https://shawna-pendry.site123.me/

Why did you become a biathlete?

I became a biathlete because my best friend cross country skied and it looked fun so I also joined the ski club, a few years later we started shooting and I loved it! Since then I have been doing biathlon.

How do you assess last season overall? Were you happy with it? Was there anything you were disappointed with?

Last season was my first season competing in international races so it was pretty scary but I also learned so much. I am happy because at each competition I had the impression that I was getting better and stronger but also because I reached one of my main goals that was to qualify for a pursuit race. I am not disappointed with anything because I know that with every mistake I made I also learned something.

How do you manage going to school with training and competing in biathlon?

It is hard to do both school and sport especially in winter because I am away so often on competitions but I am lucky to got to a “sporting school” were most of the students are like me so the teachers are very helpful, and then when I am away I have to try and work even if all I want to do is ski and sleep.

It’s not easy being a British biathlete. How are you funded and do you get support from the BBU or train with any of the British team?

I do receive financial support from the BBU who with the aid from their IBU funding cover the majority of my travel and accommodation costs during the race season. I still need to fund my equipment which I do with the aid of my parents and I am always looking for external help like crowdfunding or grants just like the ‘Vincent Budge Award’ from the British Skiers Trust that I am very proud to have just received.
Training wise I train with my local team and I will join the British team for an on snow training camp in the autumn, apart from that I do not do any training with them as I need to stay at school this season.

What is it like training where Martin and Simon Fourcade started? Have you ever met them?

It is really inspiring coming from where Martin and Simon started because I tell myself that they have become some of the best biathletes in the world so why could I not maybe some day? I have already met both of them and they’re really nice, I actually trained just next to Martin the other week when he came back home.

What are your plans for summer training?

For this summer I am training mostly at Font-Romeu and I have 3 training camps with my local team that I am looking forward to.

What are your strengths and weaknesses?

My strengths are my motivation and determination and my weaknesses are being impatient and skiing up hills.

What are your goals for this season?

My main goal for the upcoming season is to represent Team GB at the Lausanne Youth Olympic games. I also want to qualify myself to as many pursuits as possible!

If you have any time after school and training what do you like to do in your free time?

I love cooking, especially cakes and cookies (they taste so good after a hard training!) and I also like reading.

Do you have a favourite biathlon track? Where is it and why?

Yes, my favorite track is at Sjusjøen in Norway because that is where I shot my first 10/10 in competition and qualified to my first pursuit race, and because Norway is so pretty!

Who is your favourite biathlete (past or present) and why?

My favorite biathlete would either be Tiril Eckhoff or Ingrid Tandrevold because they are both inspiring women and they make biathlon look fun.

Does your rifle have a name?

No it doesn’t but I think if it did it would be something like Gwendolyn or Bernadette!

Describe yourself in three words.

Determined / organized / impatient .

Quick fire Questions:

Favourite biathlon nation (not your own): Norway
Favourite rifle design (any biathlete): the one with unicorns
Favourite ski suit design (from any nation): Finland
Favourite shooting range: Sjusjøen
Lucky bib number: I don’t have one.
Funniest biathlete on the Junior Cup/Nicest biathlete on the Junior Cup: I don’t really know anyone because I’m shy, come and say hi next season if you’re reading this!
Best thing about being a biathlete: Travelling to awesome places and missing school for it!

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Tom Lahaye-Goffart: The Return!

Next in my series of catch ups with former biathlon23 interviewees is Tom Lahaye-Goffart. His first interview was 4 years ago when he was still a Junior! Now at age 23 (which is an excellent age) he has been competing on the IBU Cup and also on the World Cup in the relay.

Follow Tom on Facebook,Twitter and Instagram!

We last spoke 4 years ago!! What has changed for you since then?

A lot of things changed for me during those 4 years. On the studies side, I graduated with a bachelor degree in Marketing and Communication, which means I can take a pause in my studies to focus 100% on biathlon! That’s a really good thing because I can completely rest between my training now (even if I didn’t work that much when I studied, but psssst, secret!). I also moved home, once again! I came back to my previous home in the South Alps but I took a flat in Villard De Lans to get the best training possibilities in France!

How do you assess last season? What were you happy with and were there any disappointments?

I’m really happy about last season! My goal was to be “back on track” after a pretty bad previous season, I didn’t expect anything in terms of results, I just wanted to feel good in what I do and not be disappointed about my races. It actually worked pretty well! My ski speed came back to normal, my shooting statistics increased a lot, and I got a few good results!
I was pretty happy with my individual race in Obertilliach in the IBU Cup. I knew I was able to do some great stuff but I never found the way to put everything together earlier, and it worked on that day! That was definitely a morale boost for the rest of the season!
On the bad side I was a bit frustrated not to get my chance on one of the individual races in the World Cup. I showed good shooting statistics all season long and didn’t get my chance to prove myself on the superior circuit. That was frustrating but that’s part of athlete life, you have to be patient!

You are part of everyone’s favourite relay team – Belgium! What is it like racing in that team?

I’m definitely proud to be part of that relay! It’s crazy how people adopted us after Hochfilzen and Oberhof 2 years ago! Being in that relay is really awesome, we don’t have that much pressure, we just do our best and we see at the finish line, and it’s always a good feeling to bother some “big nations”!

That foggy Oberhof Relay in 2018- tell us about it!

Actually that foggy relay is my worst memory as a biathlete! I wasn’t confident at all after the Hochfilzen relay, my shape was also pretty bad that season! And when you’re 21-years-old, you get the relay in 4th place as the last racer, it’s a really huge pressure on your shoulders. According to my self confidence on that day it was way too much for me, I completely cracked, made all the bad choices and lost 9 places to finish 13th! The contrast was so big at the end, everybody was so happy about the race, we led more than halfway, we got so much TV time, and I was crying on the shoulders of my sister because I f***ed up everything on that day. It took me months to get over it and find confidence again. I had so many nightmares about it! But I can say now that it gave me so much experience!

Jean-Guillaume Beatrix is Belgium’s coach now. Have you had much chance to work with him yet?

I have the chance to live really close to him now in Vercors, so I’m probably the luckiest one of the team because he can coach me on my sessions outside of training camps! So we work quite a lot together and try to find the things that can help me in shooting!

What are your plans for summer training?

The same as every biathlete I guess, lots of volume training! We will go with the Belgian team to the Summer World Champs in Minsk at the end of August, otherwise we were in Obertilliach in a camp in July, and then went to Antholz for few days to the World Championship’s location.

What are your strengths and weaknesses?

I think that my biggest strength is also my biggest weakness. I actually always try to understand everything around me, to see how things work, how to do it better and so on. It’s also a weakness because sometimes you have to do things naturally without questioning everything all the time! But my strengths and weaknesses are definitely on the mental side!

What are your goals for this season?

My main goal this season is to get to the World Cup. We are 3 athletes for 2 places, which means one will stay in the IBU Cup. After several years on it, I feel that it’s time to take a step further and discover real racing with the “big boys”. I really wish to compete in Östersund and Le Grand-Bornand, because it’s at the beginning of the season, which is the best period for me, and I’ve special connections with those places!

Is Presque Isle still your favourite track and Ole Einar Bjoerndalen your favourite biathlete?

I still like Presque Isle’s track, but my favourite track is definitely Oslo now! Skiing with a view of the Fjord is breathtaking, and reinforced by the feeling of skiing on an historical ski place!
OEB is still my favourite biathlete, he’s such a legend that I don’t even need to find arguments to justify that!

You put effort into your rifle design which is great! Have got a new design for this season or are you sticking with last year’s? Where do you get your ideas from for the designs?

I still don’t know if I will change my rifle’s design this year, I would like to but I don’t think I’ll have enough time for that! I usually have a few colors in mind and then ask around what would be the best. I always try to be original with a design that no one has. The fact is that since I chose silver, a few other athletes chose it too, so I guess I’ll change again. I hate to be in the norm!

Does your rifle have a name yet?

Still not!!

Quick fire Questions:

Favourite biathlon nation (not your own): France
Favourite rifle design (any biathlete): Michal Krcmar’s lions!
Favourite ski suit design (from any nation): USA
Favourite shooting range: Not Oberhof!
Lucky bib number: 9
Funniest biathlete on the World/IBU Cup: Too hard to chose between Michael Rösch/ Emilien Jacquelin and the Claude brothers!
Nicest biathlete on the World Cup/IBU Cup: I’ll get problems if I name a girl.. So… The womanizer Florent Claude, of course!
Best thing about being a biathlete: The purpose is easy, you have to push as hard as you’re dumb, and shoot the black!

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Kyle Barber: The Interview!

Kyle Barber is a Canadian para biathlete and cross country skier. The 27-year-old who lives in Sudbury, Ontario has been racing since 2016. He was born with underdeveloped and missing fingers on both hands, known as symbrachydactyly, which means he skis without using poles.

Follow Kyle on Instagram: k.barber.para.nordic
and Facebook: Kyle Barber ParaNordic/Biathlon

Why did you become a Para nordic athlete?

It all started from a Paralympic talent search held in Toronto, Ontario in early 2016. I went to Toronto, performed a few athletic tests and the results stated that I would be good at either cross country skiing or cycling. I chose cross country skiing because of the biathlon aspect to it and my hunting background. I met the previous Canadian Para Biathlon Coach, Kaspar (Wirz), and my current Ontario Coach, Patti (Kitler) , shortly there after and the rest is history.

How do you assess last season? What were you happy with and what disappointed you?

I assess last season as a success! I managed to gain WPNS points during the World Cup in Finland. I was not toohappy with my results at World Championships in British Columbia but I was able to shoot my first few clean rounds at in a race at World Championships. Currently I keep comparing season to season and so far it has all been a climb upwards.

What was it like competing at a home World Championships?

Competing on home soil for the World Championships was the best part about last year’s season. To have the local support and fans cheering me on around the race course really helped me keep going. I was not a fan of what seemed to be continual uphills because of skiing without poles.

You have only done a few biathlon races so far. How did you find them?

Biathlon and cross country skiing is tough! I have had a very short career thus far and I am still learning lots everyday. Biathlon is a challenge that seemed to be winning but I am not giving up on it and looking forward to performing better this upcoming season.

You have Mark Arendz and Brittany Hudak as teammates in standing biathlon. Do you get to train much with them? Have they given you any advice?

Unfortunately I do not get a lot of training time with my 2 teammates, who live in Canmore Alberta, but they are more than willing to answer my questions and let me bounce tactics off them. I do however get to train with Collin Cameron more as we are both living/training in Sudbury.

What are your plans for summer training?

Actually Collin and I just finished a training camp with our Canadian Biathlon coach John Jacques here in Sudbury. We are also getting ready to head to the Snow Farm in New Zealand leaving July 31st for 2.5 weeks. I will continue training at home while having 2 more camps in Canmore prior to the Norway World Cup in December.

What are your strengths and weaknesses?

I am stubborn. I consider that to be both a strength and weakness due to the fact I will not give up. It just all depends on the situation and how it looks when I take a step back and look at the bigger picture. My 2 biggest weaknesses while racing though is wearing glasses and trying to keep my hand/only finger warm. Since I only have the one thumb and terrible circulation, I can not wear contacts and it is hard to feel the trigger when my hand has gone numb.

What are your goals for this season?

My goals for this season are to keep improving my skiing and shooting techniques. This will entail in having better performances and results all around.

Do you have a job? If so how do you fit your training around it?

I work 40+hours a week depending on a lot of variables. Fortunately this job can be physical and I am always working outdoors. When it comes to training my coach and I make it fit, make it work and by far, make it count!

Do you have a favourite track yet? Where is it and why?

Currently my favourite track is in Canmore due to the fact of the surrounding picturesque mountain scenery. I have been told by many that this might change come August.

Who is your favourite biathlete (past or present/IBU or IPC) and why?

I thoroughly enjoy the time spent with my teammates. They all have great personalities and quite honestly I am not too familiar with or about others.

Does your rifle have a name?

It does not.

Describe yourself in three words.

Stubborn haha, challenge seeker, opportunist.

What the best thing about being a biathlete?

Everything!

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Maddie Phaneuf: The Return!

Photo courtesy of Maddie Phaneuf.

This season I am revisiting some of the biathletes I have interviewed in the past to see what has changed for them. The first ever interview on this blog was with US biathlete Maddie Phaneuf so she was the obvious choice to start with!!! 🙂

Follow Maddie on Instagram.
Check out her website: https://www.maddiephaneuf.com/

We last spoke nearly 5 years ago!! What has changed for you since then?

So much has changed! I think I may have still been living in Maine the last time we spoke, or had just recently moved to Lake Placid. Either way, since then I’ve mostly been training full time for biathlon, I took a mini break this past season (from August – March) and lived in Boulder, Colorado during that time and didn’t focus on training. Then this March I moved back to New York State and have been training again full time for biathlon. I’m back in Lake Placid, living on my own and training with the local ski club, NYSEF.

You have recently opened up about having PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) caused by the Olympics. What happened and why did you decide to about it publicly?

Basically I got really sick during the Olympics right when I was told I would finally be racing. I was beating myself up about it for months following the Olympics, and chose to go to therapy to get better. I decided to speak up about it because I know a lot of fellow athletes struggle with mental health issues, but not a lot of people actually talk about it publicly. I hope that speaking out gives others the courage to seek help.

How have you been dealing with it?

Mostly therapy. Also realizing what I need in my everyday life to keep a good balance between sport and life. For me that looks like having my own space (a house) where there’s no sign of professional sport, and I can mentally check out from training. I also have a lot of friends who aren’t teammates. Overall, just having a good balance between training and everyday life.

What advice would you give to other athletes who might have similar issues?

The biggest advice would be: You’re not weak if you ask for help. Honestly, I should’ve been going to therapy since high school, it just took me until my absolute breaking point to finally seek help. Also, know that it’s not your fault if you feel depressed/anxiety/any other mental health issue – mental health is an illness.

The US women’s team was fantastic last season. Does that inspire you to get back out training and racing to be part of it?

DEFINITELY!! I watched every race this winter when I was away from the sport, and I missed racing so much. Watching them crush it at World Championships, and leading the Women’s Relay for 3/4 of the race was so inspiring. I was so happy and proud of my teammates this season, and I’m very excited to be back on the training grind and can’t wait to race alongside them in the coming seasons.

What are your plans for summer training?

So I’m back in Lake Placid, NY training full-time with NYSEF. I’ve been training since the last week of April, and have been having a lot of fun and have been feeling great so far! I’ll be doing a lot of rollerskiing, shooting, trail running, strength training, mountain biking, and everything in between! I’ll be traveling down to North Carolina for a week in August to spend time with my family for vacation, which I’m very excited about because there are beautiful beaches down there! But yeah, nothing too crazy for me this summer, just training in New York.

What are your strengths and weaknesses?

I think strengths would be shooting well under pressure, fast shooting speed, and being able to move past bad races. My weaknesses are usually slower ski speed, balance, and wanting to go mountain biking or rock climbing during my rest days!

What are your goals for this season?

To have fun and be happy. Also to race internationally on the IBU Cup and World Cup. I’d love to see myself racing at World Championships this winter, but I have no expectations for my first season back since taking last winter off 😉

Is Canmore still your favourite track and Franziska Hildebrand your favourite biathlete?

I still love Canmore, but I think Antholz may be my current favorite. My favorite biathlete to watch race is Hanna Oberg because she’s so strong on the range.

Does your rifle have a name yet?

Haha not yet! I need suggestions…

Quick fire Questions:
Favourite biathlon nation (not your own): Canada
Favourite rifle design (any biathlete): Marketa Davidova’s unicorn rifle!!
Favourite ski suit design (from any nation): Norway’s always looks classy
Favourite shooting range: Martell, ITA
Lucky bib number: I don’t have one!
Funniest biathlete on the World Cup: Sarah Beaudry
Nicest biathlete on the World Cup: Regina Oja – she gave me her clothes when my luggage didn’t arrive in Estonia!
Best thing about being a biathlete: Traveling the world and meeting new people from other countries.

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Aidan Millar: The Interview!

Photo courtesy of Aidan Millar.

Aidan Millar is a Canadian biathlete from Canmore. He was born on the 1st of December 1995. His career best result came last season in Soldier Hollow where he finished 20th in the Sprint in his first season as a World Cup athlete.

You can follow Aidan on Instagram.

Why did you become a biathlete?

I grew up skiing from a young age and when I was 9 I got to try biathlon for the first time. At the beginning I definitely liked the shooting way more but now I would say I prefer the skiing.

Your best result came last season, 20th place in the Men’s Sprint in Soldier Hollow. Tell us about the race.

Having raced three World Cups and not been able to put together a great race I was just focusing on executing what I could and not worrying about the result. I just paced my skiing well which was important with the altitude and a challenging course. With it being a windy day hitting targets was very important and I was very focused and was able to knock them all down. Up until the last shooting I knew I was having a good one but didn’t know how good until one of our techs told me I was close to a top ten. The last lap I gave everything I had, unfortunately I slipped down the order a bit but was still stoked with the result.

What was it like getting to compete at a home World Cup in Canmore?

It was an amazing experience. At the start of the season I didn’t think at all that I would get that chance. So to somewhat unexpectedly get the chance to race at home in front of friends and family was very special.

How do you assess last season overall? Were you happy with it? Was there anything you were disappointed with?

Last season went really well. I saw big improvements in both skiing and shooting and an improvement in consistency. Most of my goals were around the IBU Cup so to be able to accomplish those and get a chance on the World Cup was sweet. Initially I was disappointed with my shooting on the World Cup so I’d like to see that improve for this coming season.

There have been big changes in the men’s team this season with retirements and a change of coach. How has that affected you?

Everything is new to me as this is my first year on the team but so far things have been going well. We have good team dynamics with everyone getting along well. The coaches are great and already I’ve seen some good improvements.

I read that you have had some issues with concussions. Has that affected your biathlon career?

There was a period of about 4 years where I missed 1-3 months a year of training due to concussions. I was never really able to build a good base for training so my ski speed and stamina suffered. Now with 2 really good years of training I feel like I’m back on track and heading towards where I want to be.

What are your plans for summer training?

This summer we will be mostly training in Canmore taking advantage of all the great training opportunities in the area. At some point in August we will have an intensity block at lower altitude and mostly likely a fall camp in Whistler.

What are your strengths and weaknesses?

I would say my biggest strength would be my downhill technique. I find I can usually make up time there. My biggest weakness is probably the consistency in my shooting.

What are your goals for this season?

This year I’d like to be consistently in the top 40 on the World Cup with maybe another top 20.

Do you have a favourite biathlon track? Where is it and why?

My favourite track would probably be Antholz. The downhills are twisty and not just straight, the climbs aren’t ridiculously steep and the views aren’t too bad either.

Who is your favourite biathlete (past or present) and why?

When I was younger I watched Emil Hegle Svendsen and Simon Schempp a lot. They were both at the top so I tried to learn from what they were doing.

Does your rifle have a name?

Unfortunately not.

Describe yourself in three words.

Disciplined, Introverted, Jokester

Quick fire Questions:
Favourite biathlon nation (not your own): Norway
Favourite rifle design (any biathlete): Aita Gasparin
Favourite ski suit design (from any nation): Russia World Championships
Favourite shooting range: Obertilliach
Lucky bib number: Don’t have one
Funniest biathlete on the World/IBU Cup: Scott Gow
Nicest biathlete on the World/IBU Cup: Anais Bescond
Best thing about being a biathlete: You get to do what you love while travelling the world.

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Callum Deboys: The Interview!

Callum Deboys is a para nordic athlete from Great Britain. The 23 year-old comes from Kirkmichael, South Ayrshire in Scotland. In 2017 he was involved in a motorcycle accident which resulted in the amputation of his left leg. Last season was his first on the Para nordic World Cup where he competes in the sitting category in both biathlon and cross-country skiing.

You can follow Callum on Instagram.
Check out his website: https://deboys.co.uk/

Why did you become a Para nordic athlete?

After my accident the best recovery for me was to set myself challenges and also just being in the right place at the right time. I was training to become a rower at Strathclyde park with my coach John Blair and he then put me in contact with Scott Meenagh. Scott gave me the opportunity to come and train with the AFPST (Armed forces para snow sports team), at the snow tunnel in Germany. I just fell in love with the sport.

Did you do any sports before your impairment?

I used to play rugby through school and done some cycling as a hobby, although in the years before my accident I hadn’t done much due to working as a chef.

Did you know anything about nordic sports before you started?

I didn’t know anything about Nordic sports.

How difficult have you found learning to cross-country ski?

It has been a very challenging journey so far, both mentally and physically. When I started my fitness wasn’t great and I wasn’t very strong, I found it very hard physically to begin with. When I became fitter and stronger everything came with it, my technique improved as I could better control the seat. The most challenging part so far has been cornering, especially finding an edge of the ski, there is such a fine line of too much or not enough. Having the mental connection to the physical movement is very difficult to begin with. Safe to say I’ve had a few bruised elbows.

Tell us about Frank.

Frank or Frankenstein is my rig. I named him this as he’s been cut, bent and fixed more times than I can remember. Frank is now bomb proof, but all the support comes at a price as he is pretty heavy. Hopefully Frank will be going into retirement this season as I have had a new frame built by S&C Engineering in Kilmarnock.

You have only done a few biathlon races so far. How did you find them?

Very interesting and challenging, the few races that I’ve done I absolutely loved. I thought cross country was hard until I tried biathlon. Having only done a few days training I’m looking forward to getting loads of shooting done throughout the year.

What are your plans for summer training?

I like to mix my training up to keep it interesting and exciting, either roller skiing, cycling or swimming. I do most of my cardio vascular training on cycle paths near Ayr or the canals in Glasgow and strength and conditioning is in the Emirates Arena in Glasgow. We have several training camps throughout the year starting from July. I love getting away to the snow tunnels through the summer to change up training and continue learning good technique on snow.

Do you have somewhere to train for shooting over the summer?

I can train at a local farm around a mile from my house, as well as at Scott Meenagh’s house. We are also planning on shooting at a few training camps this season as well.

What are your goals for this season?

My main goal for this season is to improve on my times and positions from last year but remembering I had surgery at the start of the year. Second goal is to improve my technique and control on the rig which will in turn help me improve my times. Lastly to just get in amongst biathlon and do my best.

How are you funded?

Self Funded and help from sponsors. I have received an Athlete Perfomance Award, a sportaid Scotland award and a Caf grant, with some additional help from GB Snowsports.

Do you have a favourite track yet? Where is it and why?

So far my favourite has been in Prince George, Canada. The World Championships meant so much to me because it was such a big year, only starting skiing in June to qualify for the championships was incredible. Although it was extremely cold, there was some nice technical areas and the track was just fun.

Does your rifle have a name?

Not yet….

Describe yourself in three words.

Honest, hard working, big appetite.

Quick fire Questions:
Favourite biathlon nation (not your own): Canada
Favourite ski suit design (from any nation): Canada
Favourite shooting range: Oestersund, Sweden
Lucky bib number: don’t really have one, 15
Nicest biathlete on the World Cup: Collin Cameron
Best thing about being a biathlete: It’s both mentally and physically demanding

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Bruna De Moura: The Interview!

Bruna de Moura is a biathlete from Brazil! The 25-year old comes from Caraguatatuba which is a city in the eastern part of the state of São Paulo. She competes on the IBU Cup and is a regular member of Brazil’s mixed and single mixed relay teams.

Why did you become a biathlete?

I started my athletic career as a mountain biker, but I had to stop because of a serious heart condition. After a long time I had the opportunity to undergo a surgery, after which I couldn’t practice sports for two years according to the doctors. During this time, my MTB-coach got me in touch with the Brazilian snow sports federation (CBDN), and I tried rollerskiing for the first time. Long story short: once I was allowed to practice sports again, I tried mountain biking and quickly gave it up in exchange for cross-country skiing and biathlon.

How do you assess last season overall? Were you happy with it? Was there anything you were disappointed with?

In terms of overall feeling, last season was my worst ever: all kinds of personal problems led to a lot of stress, because of which I decided to end my season as soon as the second trimester of the IBU Cup had finished. On the other hand: purely looking at my results, last season was more than excellent.
I’m happy that despite my problems, I saw significant improvements in my results. A small disappointment was my ability to deal with the stress during the season, but that’s something to learn from and improve in the next few years.

What was your best or favourite race from last season and why?

The Obertilliach Supersprint qualifying because it was a lot of fun and on the track I actually managed to overtake quite a few athletes who I’m normally behind. Apart from that, I managed to shoot well despite competing with a half-broken rifle the entire season. Last, but not least, we were told this race would not count towards the IBU Qualifying Points Ranking, but turns out…it did, and I had my best ever result!

What are your plans for summer training?

Eat a lot and gain some weight for my training period, so once the season starts I can lose the extra weight and in the competitions I feel faster 😉
On a more serious note: I want to improve my skiing technique. I’m running a lot, including a half marathon, and apart from that I recently started practicing judo. This both helps in gaining strength and it’s simply a lot of fun, which helps me to stay motivated.

What are your strengths and weaknesses?

Strengths: I’m good at uphill sections, because I’m strong which for me helps more than having a good technique, specifically on the climbs.
Weaknesses: My overall technique needs a lot of improvement. Shooting is not exactly my strong suit either (yet), mostly because I can basically not train shooting at all before the season starts, meaning I can’t touch my rifle for more than half the year.

What are your goals for this season?

To reach the criteria of the Brazilian federation, so I can get some support from them. If I reach these criteria this season, I can get some basic support for the road to the Olympics.

How are you funded? Do you get any help from Brazilian sports bodies or do you have to fund yourself?

That depends on reaching the criteria. If I reach them, my season is mostly paid for by CBDN, the national snow sports federation. If I don’t, I have to pay pretty much every single euro by myself. I’m trying to find some very much needed sponsors, but especially in a country like Brazil – not known for its cold and snowy winters – that’s not the easiest task.

Who has been the biggest inspiration or supporter of your biathlon career and why?

My biggest inspiration (and supporter) is my boyfriend, Pascal, because if not for him I would probably have stopped a while ago. He helps me a lot to find motivation when I think about giving up and his own change of routines – going from absolutely no exercise to running a half marathon recently, for example – helps me to find inspiration for my own career.

Is biathlon becoming more popular in Brazil? Are more people trying winter sports there in general?

I would not say biathlon itself is getting more popular, but winter sports in general definitely are and with it, slowly, biathlon. The number of people familiar with these sports is of course not big, but it’s certainly bigger than 10 years ago. For example thanks to Leandro Ribela’s ‘Ski na Rua’ (roller ski) project a ton of children are starting to get familiar with rollerskiing. Personally I’m coaching a small group of athletes with physical disabilities in my hometown of Caraguatatuba (say that name 10 times quickly), something I could not even have imagined 5 years ago.

Do you have a favourite biathlon track? Where is it and why?

The Obertilliach sprint track. It’s a sprint track and so it’s shorter, that helps. The uphill sections are pretty hard, but the downhill sections are not very technical, which is perfect for my abilities. A nice bonus is the end of the last downhill in Obertilliach, which finishes with two slightly banked curves: a lot of fun as long as your speed is high enough.

Who is your favourite biathlete (past or present) and why?

Laura Dahlmeier was both my favourite biathlete and my biggest biathlon specific inspiration, because she is my age and size, but is so much better than me. Her jumping technique is awesome, specifically on the uphill sections, and her last laps when in her best shape are magical.

Does your rifle have a name?

I don’t even have my own rifle, sadly. If I did, I would probably like to give it a name, although I’m not sure about the exact name yet.

Describe yourself in three words.

Honest, perfectionist*, hungry**
*a little too much, sometimes
**way too much, all the time

Quick fire Questions:
Favourite biathlon nation (not your own): Sweden, first nation with which we worked together.
Favourite rifle design (any biathlete): Anton Shipulin’s dragon
Favourite ski suit design (from any nation): USA
Favourite shooting range: Obertilliach, Austria
Lucky bib number: No lucky number, but 24 (sorry) is my favourite What? THAT’S MY NEMESIS!!!
Funniest biathlete on the World/IBU Cup: Lucas Luquinhas Martins (Brazil), more people should know him.
Nicest biathlete on the World/IBU Cup: Anna Weidel (Germany, World Cup), Gabriela Gabi Neres (Brazil, IBU Cup)
Best thing about being a biathlete: Being allowed to lay down once or twice during a race.

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