Tag Archives: Martin Fleig

Collin Cameron: The Interview!

Canadian Collin Cameron is a para-biathlete and cross country skier in the sitting category. At the 2018 PyeongChang Paralympic Games he won three bronze medals, two in biathlon and one in cross country at his first attempt. The 30-year-old also won his first World Cup para-nordic race in PyeongChang in 2017 in the cross country Sprint. He was born with arthrogryposis, a condition that causes a shortening of the lower limbs and an under-development of muscles and tendons in the legs. Currently living in Sudbury, Ontario he works as a a safety compliance and driver trainer. He received a nomination for best facial hair in the Biathlon23 Awards – probably his best achievement to date! 😉

Why did you become a biathlete?

I was getting classified in early 2016 at the team USA nationals camp in Vermont and my coach at the time (Kaspar Wirz), basically said you should try this, so I did. I saw it as an opportunity for more race starts! I had never shot in my life, nor did I have much interest in doing it if I’m totally honest.

Two L’s in Collin! What’s that about? Do you get annoyed when people only spell it with one L? Or have you developed some coping mechanisms to deal with it?!! 😉


My mother always liked the name, but didn’t want it pronounced as colon so she figured having a second L would assure that never happened and also make it a little more unique. I commonly get just one L, so I’m just used to it now.

You got two bronze medals in biathlon at the Paralympic in PyeongChang. Where did that come from?! Tell me about the races and your emotions at the end?

Not really sure where it came from. I don’t train for biathlon at home, only just getting access to a range a month before Games, my only training until that point was at training camps or during World Cups. My skiing was not the best early season, but my shooting was still there in Canmore (World Cup 1), same can be said for Oberried (WC2). Things just came together at the right time for me in Korea and I found some of my speed and pace I was missing all season until then. The 7.5km race was the first race of the Games and I set it out as a warm-up race for me to get all the bugs out and get things moving in preparation for the cross country sprint which is the race I was planning everything around. So it was an obvious shock for me to be in third after crossing the line! I didn’t really believe it.

The 15km race was interesting because it was a bit of a last minute decision to race it. I had only done the Individual once ever before (in Oberried), but we were confident in my shooting so we figured I should just enter. I knew I was in it after the last round of shooting when all the range staff were at the bottom of the first climb yelling at me to go. I managed to find a bit extra turnover after hearing that. I was met by our team psych Dr. J after the finish line and he said I was sitting third with guys still to come. I thought for sure that was going to be temporary, knowing there are some amazing biathletes still out there that hadn’t finished. Once it was confirmed though, I was so thrilled, probably more so than after the 7.5km race. It was an amazing feeling sharing the podium that day with Dan Cnossen (who had a phenomenal games), and Martin Fleig (World Champion from Finsterau). I think also it was a sweeter feeling because I was able to regroup after my 4th place in the cross country sprint, which I was somewhat disappointed with because I had targeted that as my main race. The staff on the team said I came to Korea as a sprinter and left a biathlete, which is hard to argue with!

Sorry to repeat it but you finished 4th in the cross country sprint in such a close finish. Were you a bit gutted about that or happy that you were still challenging for a medal?

Totally gutted. We had planned all the other races around that day (and possibly relay day), so it definitely felt like a disappointment to be so close, in what is normally my strongest event. All that being said, it was still probably one of my best races! I also think it was a super important learning opportunity for me. The biggest gain from that was the discussion with my coaches on how to deal with that disappointment and how to transfer that into the next few days of racing. That was huge for me, and I was able to turn that missed chance into a second bronze in the 15km biathlon.

You won a bronze in the cross country relay with Brian McKeever in the secretly Scottish team! What was that race like for you?

Being on that open relay team was by far one of my favourite moments of the Games. It was a huge honour to be on the same team with a guy like Brian, who is a legend in the para world. I think it was also a testament to how hard I worked all year to stay healthy and find my form for the Games that the coach and Brian had the confidence in me to have us as a two man team. I was really looking forward to this opportunity since mid summer when we did some time trials in New Zealand when our coach was looking at possible relay teams. I had never done a relay before and the idea of being on a relay team, and possibly the same relay team with Brian, was definitely motivating and maybe a once in a lifetime opportunity. We had a really good idea going in that it would be a three person team for the open relay, but it wasn’t until the day before that things were shuffled around and I found out I was going to be doing two legs, not just one with Brian. I got a crash course from Brian and Graham Nishikawa his guide the morning of race day on how the exchange zone worked and that was pretty much it! We had a bit of fortune in the fact that the Ukrainian team had a time penalty for an early exchange, and I lost us a tonne of time on my second leg because I has some pole issues on the last climb. It was definitely an emotional experience for me, finishing 4th again, to having that upgraded moments later to 3rd. To finish that day on the podium with Brian, his guide Russell Kennedy (and Graham, who guided Brian on the first lap and every bit deserved sharing that moment with us) will always be a fond moment when I look back at my first Paralympics.

PyeongChang was your first Paralympic Games. What did you make of the whole experience and what did you learn from it?

I learned that you can’t always measure success on how many medals you get. I had some of my best races at the Games and finished 4th and 5th. The 4th on sprint day was a very important day for me as a whole when I look at going forward with this sport and what I want to achieve in it.

What are your goals for this season in biathlon? Will you focus everything on performing well in Prince George at your home World Championships?

Main focus this year is to continue to learn and keep my focus for the next Winter Games in 2022.

You don’t live in Canmore like some of the rest of the team. And you have a job. Where and when do you train?

I train after work almost every day, sometimes on some local roads closer to home, others a little further out of town on the old highway for longer workouts. I start my workday at 4am so I can finish around 2pm to have training time in the afternoon before my wife is done work so we can still have a somewhat normal life together in the evenings, which is super important.

Who is your favourite biathlete (past or present) and why?

I have to give a shout out to Scott Meenagh here. He said in an interview a year or two ago that I was his favourite biathlete. Right back at ya, Scotty!
(Not any old interview Collin, he said it in a biathlon23 interview!!!)

Does your rifle have a name?

The rifle I use is technically the teams rifle, so I never thought of naming it. I’d have to give this some serious thought when the days comes that I have my own rifle!

Describe yourself in three words.
easy-going, driven, and hairy.

Quick fire Questions:
Favourite biathlon nation (not your own): Totally neutral, can’t pick a favourite.
Favourite rifle design (any biathlete): Mark Arendz. His samurai design is pretty cool and unique on the para side, as there are not many custom rifle designs.
Favourite ski suit design (from any nation): Our suit design for the Games is my favourite!
Favourite shooting range: Canmore. It’s tough to beat that view!
Lucky bib number: 3
Funniest biathlete on the World Cup: Emily Young. Purely based on her love and passion for the sport of biathlon. (? 😉 )
Nicest biathlete on the World Cup: Martin Fleig and Trygve S. Larson.
Best thing about being a biathlete: 3 extra race start opportunities 😉

Follow biathlon23 on Twitter! Like biathlon23 on Facebook!

Advertisements

Martin Fleig: The Interview!

Martin Fleig is a German para biathlete who competes in the sitting category. In February he won double gold in biathlon at his home World Championships in Finsterau. His victories in the 12.5km middle distance and the 15km Individual were were followed with bronze in the 7.5km Sprint event. He also won bronze in the 15km cross country race. He won the biathlon Overall World Cup last season and is the current world number one. The 28-year-old was born with spina bifida and fluid on the brain.

Like his Facebook Page: Martin Fleig
Check out his website: http://www.martin-fleig.de/

Why did you become a biathlete?

I started with cross country skiing. One day, I guess I was 14 years old or so, I tried biathlon. I really did not like it! A few years later I had the chance to get my own rifle, so I could shoot much more easily because the rifle fit me perfectly. My first competitions were not really good, but I found my motivation to go ahead with doing biathlon. And over the years the fun came too.

You became double World Champion in biathlon at your home Championships in Finsterau last season. Can you describe the feeling and what do you remember about the races?

It’s really difficult to describe. I guess I had a really good feeling before the first race started. I knew that I was in really good shape and the races at the World Cups before the Worlds were also very good for me. So I was able to start the Worlds with confidence. During the first race I often thought about my training at home at the Notschrei Nordic Center. I told myself all the time ‘you can do it, just do it like in your training’. I knew I just had to remember my shootings from the past and in my training before doing it clean. Honestly, at the 15k race I did not know about my comfortable situation by being the leader by almost 3 minutes. It was strange for me when I missed one shot because I was sure that my chance to take a medal was over. But after I finished the last shooting I heard the stadium commentator said something like‚ ‘Dont worry about your missed shot, Martin. You are still in the lead!’ That was really cool because I knew that I would be able to win a medal again.

You won both biathlon races at the World Cup round in PyeongChang. Do you like the tracks and range there? What are you goals for the Paralympic Games?

Oh yes, I really do like the tracks and also the place itself. About my goals, I am really not able to say something directly about that. Let us first start the new season and the first World Cup races and maybe then we could say a bit more about what we could expect at the PWG. All I can say now is, that I train really hard and do my best to be prepared for it! We also have to wait and see what the Russian guys will be able to do if they come back because we should not forget that those guys are the strongest skiers in the world!
(The Russian Team are currently banned by the IPC from all competitions following the McLaren Report into state sponsored doping at the Sochi Olympics.)

What have you been doing for summer training? Do you mostly train alone or with your teammates?

I have put my training into a new level. More hours overall than last year and some more technical training. We are doing a good mix of muscle and athletic training, skiing technique and also some other kinds of stamina training like handcycling, roller skiing or swimming. Most of the time I train with my Mother or alone. Twice a week I train with some teammates or with the head coach, Ralf Rombach or Michael Huhn.

Is your sit-ski custom made? Do you have the same one for roller skiing or do you need two? What is the most challenging thing for you in terms of skiing in the sit-ski?

Yes, it has been made by a firm called Rapp & Seifert – Sanitätshaus und Orthopädietechnik GmbH. A BIG thanks to those guys who make it possible for me to do my sport so successfully!!! For the upcoming season they have built me a new, much lighter sledge. So yes, now I have got two of them. To ski in the sitting position is very challenging in general. For me, the fast corners on a track are the most challenging ones.

Can you describe for my readers how you shoot from a sit-ski?

If I come to the shooting range, a coach has got my rifle in his hands and he chooses a shooting lane. Then I come to that lane, let myself fall down on my left side and the coach gives me the rifle and I can begin to shoot. After the shooting (5 targets), I get up by myself and go ahead with the next loop of 2,5km or 3km.

More and more of your fellow athletes are doing both a winter and summer sport now. Have you ever considered turning to the ‘dark side’ of summer sport? What sport would you do?

Well, I really admire those who handle both kinds of summer and winter sports at this high level. For me, in my situation it is impossible to imagine doing so. But IF I think about which summer sport I would do, it would be wheelchair races I guess. But I am not really sure about that, it is just a thought.

What are your hobbies away from biathlon and cross country?

I love photography! I prefer to be outside, no matter if I do sport or something else. To be outside gives me a feeling of freedom. And if I go outside to take photos, I can really get my mind free from all around me. It makes me feel very satisfied. I mostly photograph things like insects, flowers or things in nature.

Does your rifle have a name?

Nope.

Quick fire Questions:

Favourite biathlon nation (not your own): France
Favourite track: Ruhpolding
Favourite biathlete (IPC or IBU): Vanessa Hinz, Simon Schempp
Favourite shooting range: Oberhof
Lucky bib number: 10
Funniest biathlete on the World Cup: Martin Fourcade
Nicest biathlete on the World Cup: Laura Dahlmeier
Best thing about being a biathlete: The ability to manage the difference between skiing and shooting.

Follow @biathlon23 on Twitter! Like biathlon23 on Facebook!

Finsterau 2017: Biathlon Sprint!

fin17bs
Women’s Standing.Kononova,Liashenko,Bui

Saturday was the final day of action for the biathletes at the World Championships in Finsterau. The last day saw the biathlon sprint races take place and some familiar names on the podium.

In the women’s standing race Ukraine’s Liudmyla Liashenko matched her gold medal from the Individual by winning the Sprint title shooting clean. Defending world champion Oleksandra Kononova took silver and Ukraine made it a 1-2-3 with Iryna Bui taking the bronze.

The men’s title in the standing went to Canada’s Mark Arendz. He won by just 2 seconds from another Ukrainian Ihor Reptyukh with France’s Benjamin Daviet getting bronze.

The Ukrainians enjoyed even more success in the visually impaired events as Oksana Shyshkova with guide Vitalii Kazakov beat Germany’s Clara Klug guided by Martin Hartl. Ukraine’s Olga Prylutska with guide Volodymyr Ivanov took another bronze to add to Ukraine’s massive medal haul.

Anatolii Kovalevskyi guided by Oleksandr Mukshyn added another gold in the men’s race. Belarus’ Vasili Shaptsiaboi and guide Mikhail Lebedzeu won the silver and France’s Anthony Chalencon with guide Simon Valverde got the bronze in what was his first ever podium in biathlon.

The USA’s Oksana Masters won the women’s sitting race despite missing 2 targets. Anja Wicker was second taking another medal for the hosts and Belarusian Lidzyia Hrafeyeva grabbed the bronze.

More gold for Ukraine came from Maksym Yarovyi who won ahead of teammate Taras Rad in the men’s sitting. Germany’s Martin Fleig added a bronze to his two gold medals meaning he won a medal in every biathlon race at his home World Championships.

It has been a really good World Championships with Ukraine as the dominant team. However it was also successful for the home team Germany which always helps to make the event enjoyable for the crowd.

Follow @biathlon23 on Twitter! Like biathlon23 on Facebook!

Finsterau 2017: Biathlon Individual!

fin17bi
Men’s Standing podium. Arendz,Daviet,Ulset.

It’s Valentine’s Day so a great day to show your love for biathlon! It was also the second day of biathlon competition at the World Championships in Finsterau, Germany.

Today was the Biathlon Individual races which means 4 shoots and 15km of skiing for the men and 12.5km for the women.

The first race of the day was the Men’s Sitting and was won by Germany’s Martin Fleig who now becomes double World Champion after winning gold in the Biathlon Middle. He shot 19/20 to beat the Ukraine’s Taras Rad into second place. Norway’s Tryvge Larsen took bronze.

The Women’s sitting race was also won by a German. Anja Wicker repeated Fleig’s shooting score of 19/20 to win her first gold here in Finsterau. Silver went to Lidziya Hrafeyeva from Belarus and bronze was won by Oksana Masters from the USA.

The next races were the men’s and women’s standing events. The men’s race went to France’s Benjamin Daviet who shot 19/20. Mark Arendz from Canada shot the same score to grab the silver medal to add to his gold from the biathlon Middle. Third went to Norway’s Nil-Erik Ulset who missed 2 targets.

There was a big surprise in the women’s standing when Liudmyla Liashenko won the gold medal. The Ukranian missed just 1 target to secure gold. Normally it is her teammate Oleksandra Kononova who wins this race but she finished last missing 9 targets. The silver medal went to Japan with Momoko Dekijima getting her first medal here in Finsterau and bronze went to Iryna Bui of Ukraine.

The final races were the visually impaired races where the biathetes require a guide to help them ski around the course and an acoustic system to help them shoot.

The men’s race was won by Vasili Shaptsiaboi with his guide Dzmitry Budzilovich from Belarus. He missed just 1 target to finish ahead of silver medal winners Anatolii Kovalevskyi and guide Oleksandr Mukshyn from Ukraine. Bronze went to their teammates Vitaliy Lukyanenko and guide Ivan Marrchshak.

The women’s race meant yet another gold medal for the Ukrainian team with Oksana Shyshkova and guide Vitalii Kazakov winning after shooting the perfect 20/20. Silver went to the home nation with Clara Klug and guide Martin Hartl and bronze went to another Ukrainian pair Olga Prylutska and guide Volodymyr Ivanov.

The final biathlon race, the Sprint, takes place on the 18th of February.

Follow @biathlon23 on Twitter! Like biathlon23 on Facebook!

Finsterau 2017: Biathlon Middle

fin17bm
The German medallists

The IPC Biathlon World Championships got underway in Finsterau, Germany on Saturday. There were six biathlon races across three categories; sitting, standing and visually impaired.

The first races of the Championship were in the the middle distance biathlon which is 6km in distance with 4 shoots.

Home favourite Martin Fleig made it a great start for the German team by winning his first world title in the men’s sitting race. He only missed 1 shot to finish ahead of Ukraine´s Taras Rad who took silver and South Korea´s Eui Hyun who won the bronze.

In the women’s sitting race Lidziya Hrafeyeva from Belarus won a tough race beating two Germans to win the gold medal. Anja Wicker won the silver and Andrea Eskau took bronze making it 3 medals for the home team in the sitting races.

Canada´s Mark Arendz won the gold medal in the men’s standing, shooting clean to claim his second career world title. France´s Benjamin Daviet was second to get the silver medal and Ukraine´s reigning Paralympic champion Grygorii Vovchynskyi finished third to take bronze.

In the women´s standing, Ukraine´s Oleksandra Kononova won the gold medal continuing her domination of this event. Teammate Lyudmila Liashenko took the silver medal and Japan´s Yurika Abe got the bronze.

In the visually impaired races the Ukraine had a great day. The men´s visually impaired went to Iurii Utkin and guide Ruslan Perekhoda. Silver went to their teammates Anatolii Kovalevskyi and guide Oleksandr Mukshyn, while Dmytro Suiarko and guide Vasyl Potapenko made it a clean sweep of the podium for Ukraine taking the bronze medal.

In the women´s visually impaired race Ukraine´s Olga Prylutska and guide Volodymyr Ivanov won the gold medal and her teammate Oksana Shyshkova and guide Vitalii Kazakov took silver. Germany´s Clara Klug and guide Martin Hartl managed to break the Ukrainian dominance by getting the bronze medal and made it a great opening day of competition for the hosts.

The next biathlon races are on Tuesday.

Follow @biathlon23 on Twitter! Like biathlon23 on Facebook!