Oestersund 2019: The Individuals!

Mon Dieu, Zut alors, tres bien, restaurant and other French words!!! What a race in the Oestersund Individual for the French Men’s team! They took the top four places in one race which hasn’t been done since 2009.

Leading them was Martin Fourcade who took his first win of the season shooting 19/20. He looks in much better shape than last year thank goodness! Second place went to Simon Desthieux who also shot 19/20 but was 12.7 seconds behind Fourcade. Skiing like the wind in third was Quentin Fillon Maillet who missed 3 targets!

Fourth went to Emilien Jacquelin which is also his personal best with 2 misses. In fact 5 of the the top 7 were French with Fabien Claude coming home in 7th place with 18/20. We won’t mention the 6th member of the team though! We will mention the wax team however who prepared some excellent skis which worked really well in warming conditions.

Benjamin Weger had an excellent race in 5th and Tarjei Boe was 6th. Johannes Boe looked tired today but still finished 10th shooting 18/20. I hope he hasn’t got what Martin had last season!

There were only two men who shot clean and they were Anton Babikov in 14th and Krasimir Anev in 15th. China’s Fangmeng Cheng got a huge personal best in 22nd improving by around 60 places!!! I wonder if it has anything to do with his new coach! 😉

Jakub Stvrtecky was 32nd getting a personal best with 3 misses. Junior Champion Alex Cisar from Slovenia made his World Cup debut at 19 years old and was 92nd.

Unluckily for me I used up all my french words for the men but I should have saved some as the Women’s Individual also went to France. Justine Braisaz who had an awful sprint race on Sunday was fantastic missing 2 shots but still winning by just over 11 seconds. She came from nowhere to take her second World Cup win.

The only woman in the whole field to shoot 20/20 was Yuliia Dzhima and it was good enough for second place. Julia Simon got another podium for France and a personal best for herself in third with 2 misses.

Ingrid Tandrevold was 4th, Larisa Kuklina 5th with her personal best and Lena Haecki was 6th despite 3 misses.

Dorothea Wierer finished 7th, two places ahead of teammate and rival Lisa Vittozzi who was 9th.

There were also personal bests for Tamara Voronina in 14th, Grete Gaim in 27th and Anastassiya Kondratyeva in 34th.

Next races in Oestersund are the men’s relay on Saturday and the women’s relay on Sunday. Man the Swedes must really love a relay as they are getting 4 this week! 🙂


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Season Preview 2019/20: The Women!

The women’s World Cup is the best, isn’t it?! Year after year it has been producing the best racing and the closest title fights of any sport around. The last two seasons have both gone down to the final races and this season could well be the same.

Maybe the fact that it is so tough is why our ladies keep retiring! This year we will be without Anastasiya Kuzmina and Laura Dahlmeier who leave a big gap in the field. Luckily there are plenty of people to fill it!

Last year it was Dorothea Wierer who came out on top of an epic battle with fellow Italian Liza Vittozzi. Vittozzi faded at the end of last season but that experience will have made her stronger and more dangerous this time around. This season seems to be on course for another Italian head to head but for one thing – the World Championships! They are being held in Antholz and of course both women would dearly love to do well there. It could take their focus off the big crystal globe and on to home gold medals.

Looking to take advantage of this will be Marte Olsbu Roeiseland. Since adding a new surname she has gone from strength to strength having the best season of her career last year. She finished in fourth place but only 69 points behind the winner.

Hanna Oberg and Paulina Fialkova were fifth and sixth and will also be hoping to move up the ranking although they lack the consistency of the Italians for now. A good season for Fialkova would be taking her first World Cup win.

Obviously we have to mention Kaisa Makarainen. A three time champion she has the experience and the skiing ability to win the overall once more but she wasn’t at her best last season finishing seventh. Denise Herrmann is the surprise package. We knew she could ski fast but she has picked up the shooting very quickly and is a fierce competitor. Whether she can put it together over the course of an entire season remains to be seen.

There is a lot of talent in the women’s side just now so here are some biathletes to look out for as potential first time race winners or podium finishers.

Ingrid Tandrevold got two second places last season including a silver medal at the World Championships so could this be the year she makes it into first place? Monika Hojnisz’s best finish is a second place and she also came 4th twice so could she improve to get her first taste of victory? She married in the summer and is now Monika Hojnisz-Starega so maybe she can emulate Marte Olsbu by having extra surname success! Clare Egan had the season of her life last year getting her first podium finish in the Mass Start in Oslo and three top ten finishes in total. Hopefully she can make it to the top of the podium this year.

Looking to get on any step of the podium this season will be Mona Brorsson. She was so close to winning a gold medal in Oestersund at the World Championships and hopefully she now knows it is possible if she executes a race perfectly. Celia Aymonier was close to a first podium last season coming 4th in the Oslo Sprint. She has a home World Cup in Annecy to look forward too and it would be a great place to break into the top three. Lena Haecki achieved two fifth place finished last season so she is not far from claiming a podium either.

However as we know with the Women’s World Cup anything could happen and anyone could win or get a podium! That’s why it is so exciting.

The ladies start the season on the 1st of December with the Sprint race in Oestersund. The World Cup opens on the 30th of November with the single and mixed relays.

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Season Preview 2019/20: The Men!

The light bulbs in the floodlights have all been replaced in Oestersund, the fog machines have been serviced in Oberhof (you didn’t think that was real fog ,did you?) and the Kontiolahti Wall has been made a little bit steeper. All of which can only mean one thing – the biathlon season is about to start!

The schedule is a little different this year with Oestersund, Hochfilzen and Annecy before Christmas. Then comes Oberhof, Ruhpolding and Pokljuka. The World Championships are in Antholz and then we have three more World Cup rounds in Nove Mesto, Kontiolahti and Oslo.

The big question on everyone’s mind on the men’s World Cup is which Martin Fourcade is going to show up in Sweden? Will it be 7 times champion Martin Fourcade or 2018/19 Martin Fourcade? Fingers crossed it’s the former. It’s about time we had a proper head to head clash on the men’s World Cup.

Last season was fantastic for Johannes Boe. He won the big crystal globe with 1262 points which was 408 points ahead of his closest challenger Alexander Loginov and almost double the tally of Fourcade. Fourcade had many issues last year but he still had a great season by “normal biathlete” standards. However he is not a normal biathlete as we know and if he comes back with his old form we could have a battle between himself and Boe the likes of which we haven’t seen since Troy.

Of course there is an “Achillies Heel”! Johannes Boe is set to become a father for the first time in January. Obviously baby Boe has priority so it could mean him missing some races which could impact a close title fight. And there is Trojan Horse of injury and illness that could sneak up unexpectedly!

Won’t there be any other challengers for the title I hear you ask? No, probably not! There are many biathletes who ski as fast as Boe and Fourcade and many who shoot as well as them too. However there are none who can do both on such a consistent basis as our two favourites.

It is shaping up to be a fight between Norway and France not just via Boe and Fourcade but also with the rest of the guys too. Last season Quentin Fillon Maillet was excellent and finished third overall and Simon Desthieux was fourth. Tarjei Boe was sixth and Vetle Christiansen took a big step forward winning his first World Cup race. Antonin Guigonnat had a great season and Erlend Bjoentegaard will be looking to impress. So the relays could get very exciting as well as the individual races.

Who else should we be looking out for to do well this season? Who could taste victory for the first time and who could make the jump up onto the podium?

There is always a lot of attention on Sebastian Samuelsson after his Olympic successes but he is yet to win a race. I think people forget that he is still a biathlon “baby” aged just 22. He got his first World Cup podium last season and it would be great to see him make the jump up to the top step.

Johannes Keuhn had a great start last season getting a second place in the first race. However he faded a bit after the initial glory but it could be his chance this time to take a maiden victory.

Remember Michal Krcmar? He disappeared last season along with the rest of the Czech men’s team. The year before though he excelled so if he can get that old form back a win could be his for the first time. And let’s face it his rifle deserves a victory!

A surprise winner at the World Championships, it would be good to see Dmytro Pidruchnyi bring that confidence and attitude with him on to the World Cup this season and hopefully gets some more wins under his belt.

Johannes Dale is one to watch for possible podiums this season. He did really well debuting on the World Cup last year and has the ski speed to get among the top finishers. It would also be good to see Sean Doherty live up to the potential he showed as a Junior. 10th is his personal best so far but after joining the army this summer maybe a bit if discipline and a good haircut can propel him up the field! Attention!

Tero Seppala didn’t have the best season in 2018/19 but he had good results the year before so hopefully he can also take a step forward. Christian Gow had a fantastic season with two Top 10 finishes and he could be a good bet to grab Canada a podium this time round.

The men’s season for the Overall Title begins with the Sprint race in Oestersund on the 1st of December. The World Cup opens on the 30th of November with the single and mixed relays.

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Nicole Gontier: The Interview!

Nicole Gontier is an Italian biathlete from the Aosta Valley. The 27-year-old made her World Cup debut in 2012 and achieved her personal best result in 2015 when she finished third in the Oberhof Sprint. She has 2 bronze medals from the World Championships in 2013 and 2015 as a member of the Women’s relay team. She has represented Italy twice at the Olympics in Sochi and PyeongChang.

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Why did you become a biathlete?

I started to do biathlon thanks to my father and my grandfather who were in charge of the Aosta valley biathlon and also thanks to the atmosphere and training of the coaches of Aosta valley biathlon.

How do you assess last season? What were you happy with? Was there anything that disappointed you?

Last season I was happy about my shape on skis, I had good feelings but I have to improve my shooting on the range.

The World Championships are in Antholz! How excited are you about that?

I’m really happy that the World Championships will be in Antholz. I really like there and I hope that it will be sunny and it will be perfect. The Italian ambience is the best.

The Italian women have a really strong team at the moment. What are your expectations for the World Championships in particular the women’s relay?

Yes the Italian women are really strong but for the moment I expect nothing. I prefer to concentrate on training and then I will see my shape with the first races!

What have you been doing for summer training?

In summer we train on the shooting range and with the roller ski,running,hiking and with the bike.

What are your goals for this season on the World Cup?

Like I said before I don’t have any goals. My goal is to improve myself and I work for this, then I will see in winter where I am.

What are your strengths and weaknesses?

My strength is that my head is really hard to break so I continue to work hard also in the worst moments because I love what I do. My weakness is that I don’t really trust in me! I will have to trust more in my abilities.

What are your hobbies?

I like to read, to study, to knit and to stay with my dog! The best is to stay on the sofa with him watching the TV. I like to travel in Italy and to discover new little places and eat the special dish and drink the local wine.

Do you have a favourite biathlon track? Where is it and why?

I really like Antholz, it is a hard track but I had good feelings with it.

Who is your favourite biathlete (past or present) and why?

I really respect Martin Fourcade, he always has the situation under control and he does what he wants. I like so much Doro(Wierer) and Lisa (Vittozzi)! They are really strong.

Does your rifle have a name?

Ahah.. no for the moment no, we have a relationship of love and hate.

Describe yourself in three words.

Smiling,stubborn,sweet.

Quick fire Questions:
Favourite biathlon nation (not your own): French
Favourite rifle design (any biathlete): Lukas Hofer – last year’s rifle
Favourite ski suit design (from any nation): Italy’s suits of last year’s Championship
Lucky bib number: Mmm… I don’t have one.
Funniest biathlete on the World/IBU Cup: Sarah Beaudry
Nicest biathlete on the World/IBU Cup: Simon Fourcade (but he stopped).
Best thing about being a biathlete: We never get bored!

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Johannes Dale: The Interview!

Johannes Dale is a Norwegian biathlete who burst onto the World Cup last season. In his debut WC race in Nove Mesto he finished 15th in the Sprint and eventually got a personal best finish of 10th in the Soldier Hollow Sprint. These results meant the 22-year-old from Lørenskog finished 50th in the Total Score and won the IBU’s Rookie of the Season award.

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Why did you become a biathlete?

I became a biathlete because of my father. My father was doing biathlon back in the day. I remember the time I decided to start doing biathlon. I was in the basement of our house and looking at the medals he had won. I remember thinking that I also wanted to win these medals. I went up and told my dad that I wanted to start with biathlon, and from there, there was no way back.

How do you assess last season? What were you happy with? Was there anything that disappointed you?

Last season was in many ways my breakthrough. I started racing in the senior class in IBU-Cup and World Cup, and started to race against the best. I am happy that I have gotten to a level that I can compete with the best athletes in the world, and also already doing some good races. The most disappointing part of the season was actually in the beginning. I was doing bad races, and I didn’t qualify for anything..

You got to race a World Cup in Holmenkollen for the first time last season. What was that like?

To race in Holmenkollen was a great experience. To race at home in front of the home crowd is an amazing experience and everybody is cheering for you. It was also a special moment, because my whole family and my friends were there cheering for me during a World Cup race. A moment I have been working towards for a long time.

What have you been doing for summer training?

For the summer training I have been putting down a lot of hard work. It started in May with a lot of training hours, and during the summer and fall it gets more and more specific. I am very satisfied with the hard work I have done, and hope it will pay off.

What are your goals for this season?

My goals for this season is mainly to race in the World Cup. And when I race there, I know what kind of results I can achieve. I also have a goal of reaching the podium this winter in World Cup. I think that it can be realistic.

What are your strengths and weaknesses?

My strength has been the speed on the track over the past years. What I have to improve is to be more stable in the shooting, and control challenging situations better.

What is it like being on a team with Johannes Boe? Does it inspire you to be like him or does it make your life harder trying to keep up with him?! 😉

To be on team with Johannes Boe is great. He is a great guy, and someone I can learn from. Of course he is a good biathlete, and I can’t challenge him all the time.

On the IBU website it says your hobby is Tinder but also that you are single! Do you have any other hobbies that you are more successful at? 😉

Haha! Actually that bio is a bit old. I have an girlfriend who also is doing biathlon, and we are living together in Lillehammer. Maybe I should change the bio for the upcoming season 😉

Do you have a favourite biathlon track? Where is it and why?

For the World Cups tracks I have raced on, I have to say Nove Mesto! The atmosphere there is unbelievable, and an amazing crowd. You almost can’t hear yourself breathe. That was also my first World Cup race, so an awesome memory.

Who is your favourite biathlete (past or present) and why?

I grew up having two biathletes I looked up to. Ole Einar Bjørndalen was one of them, and a legend in biathlon. The other was Tarjei Bø, I looked very much up to him. To be on the same team as him now is awesome.

Does your rifle have a name?

My rifle does not have a name, but I love my rifle very much. For me it’s very important to have a good feeling with the rifle, and almost to feel a bit of friendship with it.

Describe yourself in three words.

Funny, relaxed and engaged.

Quick fire Questions:
Favourite biathlon nation (not your own): France
Favourite rifle design (any biathlete): Dorothea Wierer
Favourite ski suit design (from any nation): Italy
Favourite shooting range: Holmenkollen
Lucky bib number: 5
Funniest biathlete on the World/IBU Cup: Tarjei Bø
Nicest biathlete on the World/IBU Cup: The biathlon family is full of nice people, I can’t choose one!
Best thing about being a biathlete: Living the best life I can ever imagine.

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Jake Brown: The Interview!

Jake Brown is an American biathlete from Minnesota. The 27-year-old was a cross country skier until 2016 when he saw sense and became a biathlete! His progress has been rapid making his World Cup debut last season and scoring his first point when he finished 40th in the Antholz Sprint.

Follow Jake on Instagram.

Why did you become a biathlete?

I have always been a strong skate distance skier and had always wanted to try biathlon- I got the chance after racing NCAA skiing through the US Biathlon’s development program of post-collegiate cross-country skiers. Growing up I loved running, training, and pushing my limits, seeing how hard I could go. Yet I was still drawn to the great moments of team sports, like the buzzer beater in a basketball game or the 2-out at-bat in the bottom of the baseball’s ninth inning. I love that biathlon has a bit of both.

How do you assess last season? What were you happy with? Was there anything that disappointed you?

Last season surpassed my expectations for 2018-2019. I had previously raced in four IBU cups, and so was shooting for a full IBU Cup season with the goal of making top-15s and a dream goal of racing our home World Cup in Utah. I hit 15th in my first IBU Cup race and spent most of the season racing World Cups, plus World Championships. It was a season I won’t forget!

I was really happy with how I trained last year, both in preparation for and throughout the winter. However, this year I’ll seek to do a better job of staying healthy. Lucky for me, sickness struck mostly during breaks in the race schedule last year, but I don’t think the frequency with which I was getting sick would be sustainable in the long term. I want to be more intentional this year about keeping sleep, nutrition, and healthy habits a priority.

You got to race at a home World Cup in Soldier Hollow for the first time last season. What was that like?

I was glued to the 2002 Olympics which were held in Salt Lake (with XC and Biathlon at Soldier Hollow) when I was 10, so to get to race there last year was special. Biathlon is growing in the US, and hosting a World Cup in close proximity to a metro area like Salt Lake City is a great way to spread the hype for this sport.

Your best result was in Antholz where the World Championships are being held! Is that a good track and range for you? Do you like the altitude?

In general I like racing hilly courses, and a lot of courses at altitude tend to have hills. Antholz has a good variety of terrain and is definitely tough, I like that. I needed at least three breaths between shots last year, so I wouldn’t say the range is easy for me, but I enjoyed racing there last year and look forward to racing there again- what a beautiful place.

We thought Lowell Bailey and Tim Burke had finished biathlon but they are both still working with the US team. How important is it for you to still have them around?

It’s been great. We in the US often need to recruit Europeans to lead our programs, and we do benefit from having European coaches. But Lowell and Tim have as much experience as anyone, and they understand better than anyone the challenges that American biathletes face. Lowell, having spent a year in Montana leading the Cross-Cut program at the club level, and Tim, now in a development-director role, are more invested in the grassroots growth of biathlon in the US, not just trying to fast track college skiers to the World Cup (as I was). I think that’s important long term.

What have you been doing for summer training?

I dealt with lower body injuries this spring, so I did a ton of upper body aerobic training early on: mostly Ski-Erg with a little surf-ski paddling with Paul Schommer. In late June I was able to get back on roller skis and double pole plus introduce a bit a gravel biking. I’ve never been a big cyclist, but I found I really enjoy long solo gravel riding for my over distance workouts in the Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom.

What are your goals for this season?

-Increase my shooting consistency and dial in my mental approach.
-Help our team crack the top 10 in Nations Cup for both World and IBU Cup

What are your strengths and weaknesses?

A few of my strengths are hilly courses, pushing myself on the last loop, and staying positive. A few current weaknesses are staying healthy, shooting speed and shooting consistency.

What are your hobbies?

Reading, helping out with the junior ski programs at the Craftsbury Outdoor Center, exploring, water skiing, and playing sports.

Do you have a favourite biathlon track? Where is it and why?

Valcartier, Quebec. It’s a Nor-Am course on a military base, I love it because it is really challenging yet has great flow. It’s a narrow track through the forest with big climbs and fun, windy, wooded descents.

Who is your favourite biathlete (past or present) and why?

I don’t have a favorite, but I like it when an underdog puts it all together and wins- it was sweet to see Lowell win in 2017 and Dominik Windisch win last year.

Does your rifle have a name?

Nope.

Describe yourself in three words.

I love sports.

Quick fire Questions:
Favourite biathlon nation (not your own): Estonia
Favourite rifle design (any biathlete): The Unicorn one
Favourite ski suit design (from any nation): Russia’s black, blue, and pink suit from last year.
Favourite shooting range: Ruhpolding
Lucky bib number: 77
Funniest biathlete on the World/IBU Cup: Jules Burnotte, Canada
Nicest biathlete on the World/IBU Cup: Simon Fourcade, France
Best thing about being a biathlete: Becoming mentally stronger every day.

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Kristian Wulff: The Interview!

Photo courtesy of Kristian Wulff.

Kristian Wulff is a Danish biathlete and biathlon commentator. Originally a cross-country skier he came to biathlon a little later in his career. He has competed in two Summer World Championships so far. He commentates for Danish TV as well as having full time job as a teacher. He is a busy man!

Follow Kristian on Twitter: @Kristian_Wulff

Why did you become a biathlete?

I probably started as every other cross-country skier – in a sled pulled by my parents and got my first pair of skis when I was three years old. In Denmark there is not a lot of snow in winter, so we went skiing primarily in Sweden and Norway and only for a few weeks per year. When I was about 10 years old I participated in the Danish National Championships in cross-country (held in Sweden) and I found out that skiing was the perfect sport. Beautiful nature, high pulse, and demanding technique – combined!
I have participated as a cross-country skier in the Youth Olympics, Junior WCH, and WCH in Oslo 2011. But with full time study and becoming a father at the age of 26 I stopped competing – and only did training for fun. Four years ago at the age of 30 I started regular Biathlon training together with other former cross-country skiers at the local club. Now I have been to two Summer World Championships – Nove Mesto and Minsk – and I still want to train and compete even though I am on the second page on the result list.
Earlier I loved cross-country skiing because of combination of the beautiful nature, high pulse and demanding technique – NOW I love Biathlon because it adds shooting – and that makes it even more fun!

Tell us about the Summer World Championships this season?

It was a very good experience. I was in good skiing shape, but not in that good shooting shape. So I know what I need to work on. It was nice together with the other nations at the hotel, so I did some networking and talked to some of the other biathletes to get even more experience and advice to bring home to Denmark. Minsk was also a part of the trip – a tourist attraction. It was good to spent some time with the team together in Minsk on the last day. We did some classic sightseeing in a city that I would not have travelled to on my own with my family – and that’s what this is all about – to get some good times and get to know the culture in other countries.

How did you become a biathlon commentator?

I started working as cross country commentator for Eurosport in 2008-2009 but got a job offer at TV2 Denmark (a national channel) for the Olympics in 2010 – both cross country skiing and biathlon. Since then I have mostly done biathlon for TV2 and I love it. It is my passion – I would watch everything anyway. The hard thing is to combine it with time with my family, my training and my other full time job as a high school teacher.

What was the best race you commentated on last season?

Uhhh… that’s a tricky one… I think it must have been WCH Östersund 15 km Mass start with the crazy victory for Dominik Windisch. I think he came in to the last shooting placed as number 10 with everyone standing in the crazy snowstorm in Östersund and he was one of the few to shoot clean and suddenly becoming world champion! That’s what biathlon is all about!

Are you going to compete on the IBU Cup this season? If not which Danish biathletes should we look out for?

I have not done the final plans for this winter. Maybe I will be at Sjusjöen at the IBU cup or maybe before the opening of the season. But I know that my teammate Jens Hulgaard wants to qualify for the WCH in Antholz, so I hope to commentate the championships with a Danish flag on the start list!

You are teacher and a commentator? When do you have time to train and what have you been doing for summer training?

Yes, I am a full time teacher I teach geography and sport science. I train very little but very hard! That’s my motto! Sometimes in my 30 minutes lunch break I do some intervals on a Thoraxtrainer (a skiergometer) before I have to do a lecture in sports science with my students. They find it OK that I am a bit sweaty starting the class I think…
This summer I have been in southern France and in Tuscany with my family – and with my bike on the bike rack behind the car. It has been great with a lot of biking and running – but no shooting practice. So that is the key for development in biathlon to train more shooting.

You are heavily involved in trying to get more people to do biathlon in Denmark. How is it going so far?

At the summer WCH last year we were only two participants. This year we were 5 participants – 3 seniors together with 2 juniors. So that’s progress! Next year we plan to bring one or two junior girls to the summer WCH. So we are still trying to improve

What are your strengths and weaknesses? (biathlon or commentary!)

My strength is being enthusiastic – both in biathlon and in commentary!
I love skiing full speed and sometime find it difficult to calm down entering the shooting range. So maybe this is also my weakness.
And I love biathlon so much that I maybe talk a bit too much doing my commentary. So maybe that’s also my weakness.
Being enthusiastic about biathlon is both my strength and apparently also my weakness!

Do you have a favourite biathlon track? Where is it and why?

I love the track in Holmenkollen because of the crowd – I participated as a cross country skier in WCH Oslo 2011 and it was amazing to hear the “Kollenbrølet” (Kollen roar). And I commentated the WCH Oslo in biathlon in 2016 live on site at the stadium and experienced once again the crazy “Kollenbrøl”!

Who is your favourite biathlete (past or present) and why?

Like everyone else I have to say Ole Einar Bjørndalen because he could always find some small details to improve. And because he went on for so many years. I am 34 years old, so he motivates me to continue improving even though I’m not getting any younger.

Does your rifle have a name?

Ahh… nope… I actually don’t have my own rifle yet. I always use the same rifle at my club so it’s kind of mine, but I have not bought my own yet.

Describe yourself in three words.

Enthusiastic, Social, Ambitious

Quick fire Questions:
Favourite biathlon nation (not your own): Sweden
Favourite rifle design (any biathlete): hahah… Shipulin
Favourite ski suit design (from any nation): Italy (IN BLUE)
Favourite shooting range: Antholz because of the surroundings
Lucky bib number: 23…
Funniest biathlete on the World/IBU Cup: Johannes Bø
Nicest biathlete on the World/IBU Cup:Klemen Bauer
Best thing about being a biathlete: Seeing places that you would not normally see as a tourist and training with some cool stuff – skis and a rifle – what’s not to like!

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