Tag Archives: Paul Schommer

Jake Brown: The Interview!

Jake Brown is an American biathlete from Minnesota. The 27-year-old was a cross country skier until 2016 when he saw sense and became a biathlete! His progress has been rapid making his World Cup debut last season and scoring his first point when he finished 40th in the Antholz Sprint.

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Why did you become a biathlete?

I have always been a strong skate distance skier and had always wanted to try biathlon- I got the chance after racing NCAA skiing through the US Biathlon’s development program of post-collegiate cross-country skiers. Growing up I loved running, training, and pushing my limits, seeing how hard I could go. Yet I was still drawn to the great moments of team sports, like the buzzer beater in a basketball game or the 2-out at-bat in the bottom of the baseball’s ninth inning. I love that biathlon has a bit of both.

How do you assess last season? What were you happy with? Was there anything that disappointed you?

Last season surpassed my expectations for 2018-2019. I had previously raced in four IBU cups, and so was shooting for a full IBU Cup season with the goal of making top-15s and a dream goal of racing our home World Cup in Utah. I hit 15th in my first IBU Cup race and spent most of the season racing World Cups, plus World Championships. It was a season I won’t forget!

I was really happy with how I trained last year, both in preparation for and throughout the winter. However, this year I’ll seek to do a better job of staying healthy. Lucky for me, sickness struck mostly during breaks in the race schedule last year, but I don’t think the frequency with which I was getting sick would be sustainable in the long term. I want to be more intentional this year about keeping sleep, nutrition, and healthy habits a priority.

You got to race at a home World Cup in Soldier Hollow for the first time last season. What was that like?

I was glued to the 2002 Olympics which were held in Salt Lake (with XC and Biathlon at Soldier Hollow) when I was 10, so to get to race there last year was special. Biathlon is growing in the US, and hosting a World Cup in close proximity to a metro area like Salt Lake City is a great way to spread the hype for this sport.

Your best result was in Antholz where the World Championships are being held! Is that a good track and range for you? Do you like the altitude?

In general I like racing hilly courses, and a lot of courses at altitude tend to have hills. Antholz has a good variety of terrain and is definitely tough, I like that. I needed at least three breaths between shots last year, so I wouldn’t say the range is easy for me, but I enjoyed racing there last year and look forward to racing there again- what a beautiful place.

We thought Lowell Bailey and Tim Burke had finished biathlon but they are both still working with the US team. How important is it for you to still have them around?

It’s been great. We in the US often need to recruit Europeans to lead our programs, and we do benefit from having European coaches. But Lowell and Tim have as much experience as anyone, and they understand better than anyone the challenges that American biathletes face. Lowell, having spent a year in Montana leading the Cross-Cut program at the club level, and Tim, now in a development-director role, are more invested in the grassroots growth of biathlon in the US, not just trying to fast track college skiers to the World Cup (as I was). I think that’s important long term.

What have you been doing for summer training?

I dealt with lower body injuries this spring, so I did a ton of upper body aerobic training early on: mostly Ski-Erg with a little surf-ski paddling with Paul Schommer. In late June I was able to get back on roller skis and double pole plus introduce a bit a gravel biking. I’ve never been a big cyclist, but I found I really enjoy long solo gravel riding for my over distance workouts in the Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom.

What are your goals for this season?

-Increase my shooting consistency and dial in my mental approach.
-Help our team crack the top 10 in Nations Cup for both World and IBU Cup

What are your strengths and weaknesses?

A few of my strengths are hilly courses, pushing myself on the last loop, and staying positive. A few current weaknesses are staying healthy, shooting speed and shooting consistency.

What are your hobbies?

Reading, helping out with the junior ski programs at the Craftsbury Outdoor Center, exploring, water skiing, and playing sports.

Do you have a favourite biathlon track? Where is it and why?

Valcartier, Quebec. It’s a Nor-Am course on a military base, I love it because it is really challenging yet has great flow. It’s a narrow track through the forest with big climbs and fun, windy, wooded descents.

Who is your favourite biathlete (past or present) and why?

I don’t have a favorite, but I like it when an underdog puts it all together and wins- it was sweet to see Lowell win in 2017 and Dominik Windisch win last year.

Does your rifle have a name?

Nope.

Describe yourself in three words.

I love sports.

Quick fire Questions:
Favourite biathlon nation (not your own): Estonia
Favourite rifle design (any biathlete): The Unicorn one
Favourite ski suit design (from any nation): Russia’s black, blue, and pink suit from last year.
Favourite shooting range: Ruhpolding
Lucky bib number: 77
Funniest biathlete on the World/IBU Cup: Jules Burnotte, Canada
Nicest biathlete on the World/IBU Cup: Simon Fourcade, France
Best thing about being a biathlete: Becoming mentally stronger every day.

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Antholz 2017: The Individuals!

ant17mi

It’s World Cup round 6 ( I know, already!) and we find ourselves in the beautiful surroundings of Antholz-Anterselva. On Thursday the women were racing yet again! They have had a particularly tough schedule since coming back after the Christmas break and I am sure competing at altitude is not helping with tiredness.

This is possibly one of the reasons for the bad shooting in the Individual but the main reason was the strong gusty wind conditions. In fact you could say the conditions on the shooting range were Krapfen!! 😉 ( a fried doughnut of South Tyrol). With some biathletes missing 10 shots out of 20 it was mainly in the shooting range that this race was decided.

That meant of course that Laura Dahlmeier won the race but ironically she wasn’t the best shot on the day however her superior skiing helped her claim the victory. It also meant that she took back the lead in the overall and will wear the yellow bib in the mass start.

Not a single women shot 20/20 but the closest to that with 19/20 were Anais Chevalier who was second and Italy’s Alexia Runggaldier who was third. It was Runggaldier’s best ever result on the World Cup and getting your first ever World Cup podium at home is really special and made a great start to the World Cup for the Italians.

There were only another two women who missed just one target, Olga Poltoranina of Kazakhstan and Canada’s Emma Lunder whose 21st place was her personal best result. Among the others Gabriela Koukalova missed 6 targets as did Domracheva and Wierer and Selina Gasparin missed 10.

The men’s race was on Friday was of course was won by Anton Shipulin or as I have called him for years Ant-holz Shipulin because of his love of this place. He always races well in Antholz and is obviously very comfortable with the altitude. Not even Martin Fourcade could stop him winning here. Well actually he could have if he hadn’t missed 2 targets to Shipulin’s one miss but that 1 target was the difference as Anton won by 41 seconds.

Third place went to Sergey Semenov who is fantastic in the Individual. He missed just one target on the final standing shoot and was only 56 seconds from the lead time. If he had hit 20/20 the race would have been his.

In fact there was only one man who did shoot clean and that was Lenart Oblak from Slovenia who was 35th with a career best result. Another personal best went to Lorenz Waeger of Austria who was 20th with 2 misses. I am not sure what they are feeding the Canadians (probably some sort of maple based syrup) but they got another personal best this time from Scott Gow in 17th.

Ole Einar had another good race coming 4th, Lowell Bailey continued his good form in 10th and his teammate American new comer Paul Schommer came 33rd in his first World Cup race!

So now we move on to a weird programme of the Women’s Mass Start and the Men’s Relay tomorrow! Not the normal schedule but it should be a good day of racing!

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